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ECONOMIC HISTORY

Program

EN IT

Updated A.Y. 2018-2019

Economic History

University of Rome “Tor Vergata”

Bachelor Degree in Business Administration & Economics

A.Y.  2018/2019

 

 

Instructors

Prof. Giovanni Vecchi - giovanni.vecchi@uniroma2.it

Prof. Brian A’Hearn - brian.ahearn@pmb.ox.ac.uk

Teaching Assistant

Dr. Giulia Mancini - giulia.mancini@uniroma2.it

 

Office hours (room P2 S49)

Prof. Vecchi: During the course (Feb 19-Mar 28): Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 15:00-16:00. After the course: on appointment.

Prof. A’Hearn: Between Mar 12- 21: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 17:00-19:00.

 

Course topic

The international economy from the mid-19th century to the present.

 

Attendance

Not recorded, but important.

 

Exam

All students are required to sit a written examination. The test consists of three questions, and lasts 1.5 hours. The exam calendar is available at the webpage of the course. No other dates (pre-exams, exceptional sessions, etc.) can be scheduled. 

Note that cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated. In the event that a student is found cheating during the written exam, the student will get a failing grade. The student will need to sit the written exam again, and will be reported to Director of the CdS.

 

Note

Please always address your communications to both Prof. Vecchi and Dr. Mancini. Unsigned emails will not be answered.

 

 

Outline of the course

1.     The pre-industrial economy and the Malthusian growth model

2.     Britain’s Industrial Revolution 

3.     The First Globalization

3.1.   International trade and the Ricardian model

3.2.   The age of mass migration

3.3.  International capital flows

3.4.  The Heckscher-Ohlin model

3.5.  The International Monetary System

4.     WWI – The War Economy and the Economic Consequences of the Peace

5.     The International Economy between the WW: the Great Depression

6.     WWII: Bretton Woods and the Marshall plan

7.     Europe’s Golden Age (1950-1973)

8.     The crisis of the 1970s (1971-1989)

9.     From the Second Globalization to the present day (1989-2007)

10.  Two Centuries of inequality and poverty around the world

 

 

Lectures and readings

All readings will be available for download at the course webpage. All readings are compulsory, unless otherwise specified.

 

Feb 19 and 20, lectures 1 and 2: The pre-Industrial economy and the Malthusian growth model

Readings:

-      Deaton, A. (2014). The Great Escape, Princeton University Press (Chapter 2).

-      Clark, G. (2008). A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World.Princeton University Press (Chapter 2).

 

Feb 21, lecture 3: Britain’s Industrial Revolution and Modern Economic Growth

Readings:

-      A’Hearn, B. (2014). The British industrial revolution in a European mirror. In R. Floud, J. Humphries and P. Johnson (eds.), The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain. Vol. I: 1700-1870.

-      Allen, R.C. (2010). Why the industrial revolution was British: commerce, induced invention, and the scientific revolution. Economic History Review.

 

Feb 26, lecture 4: The first globalization (I – International trade)      

Readings:

-      O’Rourke, K. and J.G. Williamson (1999). Globalization and History. The evolution of a nineteenth-century Atlantic economy. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press (Chapter 2).

-      Krugman, P. R., Obstfeld M., and M. Melitz (2014). International Economics: Theory and Policy. 10th Edition. Prentice Hall (Chapter 3 - not compulsory).

-      Kuznets, S. (1973). Modern economic growth: findings and reflections. The American economic review, 63(3), 247-258 (not compulsory).

 

Feb 27, lecture 5: The First Globalization (II – Mass Migration)

Readings:

-      O’Rourke, K. and J.G. Williamson (1999). Globalization and History. The evolution of a nineteenth-century Atlantic economy. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press (Chapter 7).

 

Feb 28, lecture 6: The First Globalization (III – International Capital Flows)

Readings:

-      O’Rourke, K. and J.G. Williamson (1999). Globalization and History. The evolution of a nineteenth-century Atlantic economy. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press (Chapters 11 and 12).

 

Mar 5, lecture 7: The First Globalization (IV – The Heckscher-Ohlin Model)

Readings:

-      O’Rourke, K. and J.G. Williamson (1999). Globalization and History. The evolution of a nineteenth-century Atlantic economy. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press (Chapters 1, 3 and 13).

 

Mar 6, lecture 8: The First Globalization (V – The International Monetary System)

Readings:

-      Cameron, R. and L. Neal (2002). A Concise Economic History of the World, From Paleolithic Times to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press (Chapter 12).

-      Eichengreen, B. (1996). Globalizing Capital. A History of the International Monetary System. Princeton: Princeton University Press, Ch. 2 (“The Gold Standard”), pp. 7-44.

-      Krugman, P. R., Obstfeld M., and M. Melitz (2014). International Economics: Theory and Policy. 10th Edition. Prentice Hall (Chapter 19 - not compulsory).

 

Mar 7, lecture 9: Gender inequality and women’s work throughout history

Readings:

-      Van Nederveen Meerkerk, E. J. (2014). Gender and Economic History. The Story of a Complicated Marriage. The Low Countries Journal of Social and Economic History, 11(2), 175-197.

-      Costa, D. L. (2000). From Mill Town to Board Room: The Rise of Women's Paid Labor. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 14(4): 101-122.

 

Mar 12, lecture 10: The War Economy and the Economic Consequences of the Peace

Readings:

-      Broadberry, S. and M. Harrison (2009). The economics of World War I: an overview. In Broadberry, S. and M. Harrison, eds., The economics of World War I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

-      Feinstein, C.H., P. Temin and G. Toniolo (2008). The World Economy between the World Wars. New York: Oxford University Press (Chapters 1 and 2)

 

Mar 13, lecture 11: The economy between the World Wars and the Great Depression

Readings:

-      Feinstein, C.H., P. Temin and G. Toniolo (2008). The World Economy between the World Wars. New York: Oxford University Press (Chapters 3, 4 and 6).

 

Mar 14 and 19, lectures 12 and 13: The Bretton Woods conference    

Readings:

-      Feinstein, C.H., P. Temin and G. Toniolo (2008). The World Economy between the World Wars. New York: Oxford University Press (Chapter 10).

-      Cameron, R. and L. Neal (2002). A Concise Economic History of the World, From Paleolithic Times to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press (Chapter 15).

 

Mar 20, lecture 14: The Marshall Plan

Readings:

-      Eichengreen, B. (2006). The European Economy Since 1945. Princeton university Press (Chapter 3).

-      De Long, J. B., and Eichengreen, B. (1991). The Marshall Plan: History's most successful structural adjustment program (No. w3899). National Bureau of Economic Research (not compulsory).

 

Mar 21, lecture 15: Europe’s Golden Age (1950-1973)

Readings:

-      Toniolo, G. (1998). Europe’s golden age, 1950-1973: speculations from a long-run perspective. Economic History Review, LI, 2: 252-67.

-      Eichengreen, B. (2006). The European Economy Since 1945. Princeton University Press (Chapter 4).

 

Mar 26, lecture 16: The crisis of the 1970s (1971-1989)

Readings:

-      Frieden, J. (2006). Global Capitalism. Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century. Norton (Chapter 16).

-      Eichengreen, B. (2006). The European Economy Since 1945. Princeton University Press (Chapter 8).

 

Mar 27, lecture 17: From the Second Globalization to the present day (1989-2007)

Readings:

-      Eichengreen, B. (2006). The European Economy Since 1945. Princeton University Press (Chapters 9 and 10).

 

Mar 28, lecture 18: Two centuries of inequality and poverty around the world

Readings:

-      Bourguignon, F., and Morrisson, C. (2002). Inequality Among World Citizens: 1820-1992. American Economic Review, 92(4): 727-744.

-      Lakner, C., and Milanovic, B. (2016). Global income distribution: From the fall of the Berlin Wall to the Great Recession. The World Bank Economic Review, 30(2), 203-232 (not compulsory).